Clinical Hair Regrowth

hair-(before)

Hair grows everywhere on the human skin except on the palms of hands and the soles of feet, but many hairs are so fine they’re virtually invisible. Hair is made up of a protein called keratin that is produced in hair follicles in the outer layer of skin. As follicles produce new hair cells, old cells are being pushed out through the surface of the skin at the rate of about six inches a year. Losing a lot of hair (more than 100 hairs a day) can be caused by inherited factors, disease, stress, medicines, injury, aging, or hair care.

Hair may simply thin as a result of predetermined genetic factors, family history, and the overall aging process. Many men and women may notice a mild and often normal physiologic thinning of hair starting in their thirties and forties. Other times, normal life variations including temporary severe stress, illness, nutritional changes, and hormonal changes like those in pregnancy, puberty, and menopause may cause hair loss.

The most common cause of hair loss is genetics—you inherit the tendency to lose hair from either or both of your parents. This is called male-pattern hair loss or female-pattern hair loss. Men generally develop bald spots on the forehead area or on the top of the head, while women often have thinning of the hair on the top of the head.

If you are concerned about your hair issues, you may start by seeing doctors to get more advanced diagnosis and treatment of hair thinning and loss.

Menu